Supervised Enterprise Projects (SEPs)

One of the innovative aspects of the Mid-Career Agricultural Extension BSc Program is a component in which students plan and execute independent field-based projects called the Supervised Enterprise Projects (SEPs) with the main objective of narrowing the gap between theory and practice.


New Taro Variety introduced by Dadiso Finta (left side), a mid-career student at Haramaya University (Ethiopia)
SEPs have been very much commended by the graduates, instructors and employers, and have greatly enhanced the performance, confidence and professionalism of graduates. The main aim of the SAFE program is to produce graduates with the requisite human relations, methodological and technical skills that can assist farmers.  Emphasis is therefore placed on experiential learning; i.e. the combination of theory, experience, critical reflection and practice. Consequently, the concept of SEPs is the means of nurturing the philosophy of experiential learning, which is derived from the vision, mission, and strategic objectives of the SAFE program.

 

The principal objective of SEPs is to narrow the gap between theory and practice. The SEPs are, thus, designed to immerse students in valuable farmer-focused, experience-based learning activities, reduce the discrepancy between training and the tasks the extension staff perform in their real work environment, and avoid the traditional tendency of making the training too theoretical. The essence of SEPs is to develop the students’ ability to identify problems and explore practical ways to correct them. SEPs are organized in two phases.


During the first phase, which takes place at the end of the first year study (After one academic year of coursework on-campus), each student goes back to their work areas to conduct an assessment of farmers’ extension needs from which each student develops an extension project proposal to address those needs. This is performed with the assistance farmers, employers and lecturers (supervisors). Each project includes an extension research component.

 

The second phase takes place after the completion of three semesters of study on campus. During the second phase, students return to their respective work areas to implement their projects independently over a period of six to nine months.

In General, SEPs are believed to have contributed to the enhancement of indigenous research (applied and adaptive) capability.  The off-campus SEP reports are also believed to be valuable sources of information for national and international organizations involved in agricultural development work of countries.


Mid-career student of UCC (Ghana) promoting budded seedlings at nursery site, Ghana
Strengths of SEPs

 

1. SEPs have given the university experience and confidence in running tailor-made, flexible, and practically oriented programs, and the university staff the opportunity to interact with adult students and to handle courses in a participatory and experiential manner.

  • 2. SEPs projects contribute significantly to increasing the productivity and income of farmers.

 

Future Plans

 

  • 1. Mobilize stakeholders and domestic resources to ensure the sustainability of the off-campus Supervised Enterprise Projects (SEPs).
  • 2. Provide technical and financial support for selected female students to implement their SEPs on identified thematic issues along the entire value chain agriculture.
  • 3. Involve different stakeholders (such as Alumni Associations, SG2000 staff, employers, etc) in SEP supervision.
  • 4. Create awareness and identify potential relevant areas of interest for SEPs, etc.

 

Abstracts of Supervised Enterprise Projects (SEPs) will be uploaded soon. Stay tuned!

 




Voices from the Field

  • Empowering Groups with Special Needs in Ethiopia. More
  • SAFE program helping communities engage in value-chain oriented, improved agricultural practices. More
  • “SAFE`s part in my life has been immense”, Coulibaly K. Mallé. More
  • “No better time than now to thank SAFE”, Mesele Yilma, More
  • “When knowledge empowers you, challenges are not problems”, Patience Kantomah, SAFE mid-career student at Bayero University, Nigeria.More
  • "My dream to educate my children has come true", George Mutebe, Uganda.
    More
  • “My thanks are enormous for Sasakawa`s intervention”, Misaye Mitiku, Ethiopia. More
  • “The reason why our cooperative is a primary model cooperative is because of Sasakawa`s intervention”, Tike Fekade, Ethiopia. More
  • “We realized crop failure is farmers’ failure”, Muhammmad Yaro, Nigeria. More

Vision 2020

Effective extension delivery systems in Sub-Saharan Africa that are based on farmer needs and demands along the entire agricultural value chain, with a special focus on smallholder farmers, most of whom are women.

SAFE Mission

Strengthening agricultural education institutions in sub-Saharan Africa to provide demand driven, value chain oriented, training for mid-career agricultural advisory workers.

 

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Publications

  • Feeding The Future: Special SAFE Anniversary Edition - 2013Download
  • Progrees Report of the Sasakawa Africa Fund for Extension Education: 2011-2012 Download
  • Proceedings of the 2006 SAFE Regional Networking Workshop - Tanzania Download
  • Proccedings of the 2008 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Nigeria Download
  • Proccedings of the 2009 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Ethiopia Download
  • Proccedings of the 2010 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Ghana Download
  • Proccedings of the 2011 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Malawi Download
  • Proccedings of the 2012 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Benin
    [French] Download
  • Proccedings of the 2012 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Benin
    [English] Download
  • Proccedings of the 2013 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Tanzania Download
  • Proccedings of the 2014 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Mali Download
  • Proccedings of the 2015 SAFE Regional Technical Networking Workshop - Uganda Download
  • A Case Study on Sasakawa Africa Fund for Extension Education Programs in Ghana - 2007Download
  • Impact Assessment of the Sasakawa Africa Fund for Extension Education Program in Ghana - 2007 Download
  • A Case Study on Sasakawa Africa Fund for Extension Education Programs in Ghana - 2008 Download
  • Impact Assessment of the B.Sc. Program for Mid Career Extension Professionals at Haramaya University, Ethiopia- 2010Download
  • Assessment of the Sasakawa Africa Fund for Extension Education's Training Program at Alemaya University, Ethiopia - 2005Download
  • Assessment of the SAFE Program in Mali with Special Focus on SEPs - PhD Dissertation - 2010Download
  • Évaluation du programme de Maîtrise en Vulgarisation Agricole - IPR/IFRA [Mali] - 2010 Download